SOUND

ADR AUTOMATIC DIALOGUE REPLACEMENT

The process of recording new dialogues in a studio in a controlled environment. It is used in cases where original dialogues weren’t properly recorded or the recording has different kinds of problems (noise, bad rendering, and more).

ASYNCHRONOUS SOUND

The sound that does not precisely match the action that unravels on screen.

BIDIRECTIONAL MICROPHONE

The microphone whose front and back part are equally sensitive.

LEITMOTIV

A short musical phrase that signifies a specific action or visual element. When repeated, it indicates that something is about to happen. In terms of dramaturgy, it functions as an insinuation (association).

LIP SYNC

Τhe precise synchronization of dialogue sound with its visible source. This descriptive term originates from the synchronization between the lips of the actors and the spoken vocals.

LITERAL SOUND

The sound that exists within the reality of a story (eg. the sound of a baby’s cry when a scene features an actual image of the baby).

NARRATION / VOICE OVER

The descriptive or explanatory use of the voice of a narrator that is imposed to the visual narrative. It can facilitate the connection between different sequences and clarify the film’s narrative intentions.

OFFSCREEN SOUND

The sound that originates from a source that is found within the scene’s setting, but beyond the borders of the frame, i.e. we don’t see the source on screen. For example, we watch a scene set in a classroom: we can see the pupils attending, we can hear the sound of the teacher’s voice, but we cannot see her. The teacher’s voice is “offscreen sound.”

AUDIO MIXING

The combination of a variety of different sounds – dialogues, ambient sound, music, and more – or the combination of different scores in a final cohesive soundtrack.

SOUND CONTINULTY

The calibration of the desired volume and quality of sound after the editing stage.

SOUND

The vibrations that travel through the air or through another medium and are perceived through hearing. For the needs of audiovisual productions, these vibrations are triggered on purpose in order to transmit audio information to their recipient.

SOURCE-CONNECTED SOUND

The sound that always refers to its visual source, in other words, the sound which we hear simultaneous to the image from which it originates. For instance, we have a close up of a speaker and at the same time we see him speaking.

SOURCE-DISCONNECTED SOUND

The sound that is not connected with its visual source, in other words the sound we can hear but we cannot realize where it’s coming from, while most possibly we are looking at something else.

ACTIVITY 1

  1. Watch the trailer of the film Apocalypse Now on YouTube. Turn up the volume and turn your back to the screen. Try to describe what is happening in terms of action, by focusing on the volume and the sounds of music and of the environment. Is it a war scene, a romantic scene or a comic scene? Is the scene shot indoors or outdoors? Is there a crowd?
  2. Try to watch the trailer again and experiment with the volume. What differences do you observe when the sound is increased and decreased? Are the atmosphere or the feelings that are generated any different?
  3. Watch the trailer after you have muted the sound and you have started playing another piece of music, for instance your favorite soundtrack. Does the change of music affect the meaning of the shots?
  4. Sound design consitsts in four inextricable elements: atmosphere, sound effects, music, dialogues. In your opinion, how does sound create meaning? Does it help you recognize the character’s motives and interpret the themes and their narration?
  5. Discuss the influence of the sounds that are sound in a thriller, on the occasion of this video.

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